Music:  Buffalo's Heart by Red Tail Chasing Hawks
Many people dwelt nearby.  There was an old woman who had a daughter, a beautiful maiden.  They lived near a river.  Across this river, on the other
shore, Bat [u'ts' uts] lived alone.  He was young, and he was known as Bat-Youth.  He owned all kinds of good things such as soft, furry robes and
skins.  He had all kinds of things.

Coyote [itsaya' ya] thought up a scheme in connection with Bat.  Coyote built a canoe and paddled across the river to Bat's lodge.  He arrived there
and addressed Bat in these words, "I came across only to see you.  How is it, Bat-Youth, that this state of affairs exists?  Across the river is a maiden
who lives with her mother.  A long time ago you had an elder brother, and his wife was the eldest daughter of this maiden's mother.  And now, this
maiden, the youngest daughter, and you are rightly mates according to marriage custom."

"Yes?" Bat replied.  "I did not know these things about myself."

Coyote continued, "Here you live in a good lodge.  You have all kinds of valuable possessions, and why should you not bring this maiden here?"  As a
matter of fact, however Bat was a very homely youth, and that is why Coyote lied to him and convinced him about these matters.

Bat said, "Yes, that is what I will do.  I did not know about myself before.  It is good that you have told me.  I will go across the river to this maiden."

"Yes," Coyote replied, "but exactly when will you come?  I will speak to the maiden and have her meet you."

Then Bat told Coyote when he would go across the river.  Here foolish Bat began to prepare for departure.  He packed up cushions, skins, and many
other things.  "Now I am ready," he finally said.  He went down to the shore and began to shout in his own peculiar words ["ta' qats, taqatslu' ya"] by
way of summoning someone across the river to come after him.

"Somebody is over on the other shore shouting to be ferried across.  I wonder who he is?" the people commented to one another.

But Coyote knew.  "He is coming," he thought.  And he went over to the maiden and said to her, "You should paddle across.  I am very busy myself.  It
is Bat, and you can ferry him across."  The maiden went down to the shore and put out in a canoe.  In a little while she landed on the shore and put the
canoe in position for her passenger to step aboard easily.

Bat stood there, but he made no move to get into the canoe.  Then he began to waggle his head as if to tell the maiden, "Point the bow of the canoe
upstream."  She did what he seemed to want.  Then Bat waggled his head by way of saying, "Pull forward a little."  The maiden did this, and now the
canoe rested flush against the ground along its whole length.  Bat was most elaborately dressed.  Suddenly he ran over to where the maiden sat in the
stern of the canoe, jumped on her knee, and sat there.  There he was perched on her knee.

"What is he doing?" the maiden thought.  She tried to paddle the canoe, but she was so encumbered by Bat's presence on her knee that she could
scarcely make headway.  She managed at last to paddle across.  The canoe had no more than touched shore when Bat jumped ashore ahead of her.  
There was a sudden jangle of his adornments as he alighted on the ground.  The maiden got out of the canoe and tied it up.  Then she started home, but
Bat followed her along --followed her right home.  The maiden entered her lodge and sat down.  Bat followed her inside and again he hopped on her
knee and sat there.  There sat Bat when Coyote arrived.

Coyote began to whittle shavings from a piece of cedar wood.  He said to Bat, "So this is what you have decided to do, Bat?  It is good that you have
come.  You must have thought, 'Because they were thus once, that, of course, is what is always done.'"  There sat Coyote busily cutting cedar shavings.

But now the old woman, the maiden's mother, wondered, "What is he talking about?  There were never any such relations.  I never had a daughter
like that."

Then the maiden began to weep.  "So this is what they are doing!" she realized.  Bat leaned over to her and said, "Do not weep.  I still have many other
skins across the river.  Let them take these."

Bat thought she was weeping because they were taking those things which he had brought.  So Bat talked to the maiden and tried to soothe her
feelings.  Coyote talked on incessantly while he whittled cedar shavings.  He kept lying as he talked.

The women wondered, "Whatever is he talking about?"  Bat sat there, his eyes indiscernible.

Then Coyote took his cedar shavings and thrust them into the fire.  There was a sudden "Crackle, crackle, crackle [t'a' qaqaq, t'a' qaqaq]" of burning
cedar.  "This place is afire!" shouted Coyote.  The flames leaped high.  "This place is afire!" shouted Coyote.  Alarmed, Bat suddenly lifted his head and
looked up.  Oh, his tiny, beak-like eyes came into view.  "See Bat's eyes!  See Bat's  
Bat and Coyote

A Nez Perce Legend
Many people dwelt nearby.  There was an old woman who had a daughter, a beautiful maiden.  They lived near a river.  Across this river, on the other
shore, Bat [u'ts' uts] lived alone.  He was young, and he was known as Bat-Youth.  He owned all kinds of good things such as soft, furry robes and
skins.  He had all kinds of things.

Coyote [itsaya' ya] thought up a scheme in connection with Bat.  Coyote built a canoe and paddled across the river to Bat's lodge.  He arrived there
and addressed Bat in these words, "I came across only to see you.  How is it, Bat-Youth, that this state of affairs exists?  Across the river is a maiden
who lives with her mother.  A long time ago you had an elder brother, and his wife was the eldest daughter of this maiden's mother.  And now, this
maiden, the youngest daughter, and you are rightly mates according to marriage custom."

"Yes?" Bat replied.  "I did not know these things about myself."

Coyote continued, "Here you live in a good lodge.  You have all kinds of valuable possessions, and why should you not bring this maiden here?"  As a
matter of fact, however Bat was a very homely youth, and that is why Coyote lied to him and convinced him about these matters.

Bat said, "Yes, that is what I will do.  I did not know about myself before.  It is good that you have told me.  I will go across the river to this maiden."

"Yes," Coyote replied, "but exactly when will you come?  I will speak to the maiden and have her meet you."

Then Bat told Coyote when he would go across the river.  Here foolish Bat began to prepare for departure.  He packed up cushions, skins, and many
other things.  "Now I am ready," he finally said.  He went down to the shore and began to shout in his own peculiar words ["ta' qats, taqatslu' ya"] by
way of summoning someone across the river to come after him.

"Somebody is over on the other shore shouting to be ferried across.  I wonder who he is?" the people commented to one another.

But Coyote knew.  "He is coming," he thought.  And he went over to the maiden and said to her, "You should paddle across.  I am very busy myself.  It
is Bat, and you can ferry him across."  The maiden went down to the shore and put out in a canoe.  In a little while she landed on the shore and put the
canoe in position for her passenger to step aboard easily.

Bat stood there, but he made no move to get into the canoe.  Then he began to waggle his head as if to tell the maiden, "Point the bow of the canoe
upstream."  She did what he seemed to want.  Then Bat waggled his head by way of saying, "Pull forward a little."  The maiden did this, and now the
canoe rested flush against the ground along its whole length.  Bat was most elaborately dressed.  Suddenly he ran over to where the maiden sat in the
stern of the canoe, jumped on her knee, and sat there.  There he was perched on her knee.

"What is he doing?" the maiden thought.  She tried to paddle the canoe, but she was so encumbered by Bat's presence on her knee that she could
scarcely make headway.  She managed at last to paddle across.  The canoe had no more than touched shore when Bat jumped ashore ahead of her.  
There was a sudden jangle of his adornments as he alighted on the ground.  The maiden got out of the canoe and tied it up.  Then she started home, but
Bat followed her along --followed her right home.  The maiden entered her lodge and sat down.  Bat followed her inside and again he hopped on her
knee and sat there.  There sat Bat when Coyote arrived.

Coyote began to whittle shavings from a piece of cedar wood.  He said to Bat, "So this is what you have decided to do, Bat?  It is good that you have
come.  You must have thought, 'Because they were thus once, that, of course, is what is always done.'"  There sat Coyote busily cutting cedar shavings.

But now the old woman, the maiden's mother, wondered, "What is he talking about?  There were never any such relations.  I never had a daughter
like that."

Then the maiden began to weep.  "So this is what they are doing!" she realized.  Bat leaned over to her and said, "Do not weep.  I still have many other
skins across the river.  Let them take these."

Bat thought she was weeping because they were taking those things which he had brought.  So Bat talked to the maiden and tried to soothe her
feelings.  Coyote talked on incessantly while he whittled cedar shavings.  He kept lying as he talked.

The women wondered, "Whatever is he talking about?"  Bat sat there, his eyes indiscernible.

Then Coyote took his cedar shavings and thrust them into the fire.  There was a sudden "Crackle, crackle, crackle [t'a' qaqaq, t'a' qaqaq]" of burning
cedar.  "This place is afire!" shouted Coyote.  The flames leaped high.  "This place is afire!" shouted Coyote.  Alarmed, Bat suddenly lifted his head and
looked up.  Oh, his tiny, beak-like eyes came into view.  "See Bat's eyes!  See Bat's  eyes!  See Bat's eyes!"  Coyote howled in glee, and "Ha ha ha!  [Ha
ha ha a'haha, a'haha]" he laughed uproariously.

Bat rushed out of the door and ran pell-mell down to the shore, his adornments jingling at every step.  He ran right up to a canoe, jumped aboard,
and pulled for the opposite shore.  There he landed, and with a push of the foot he sent the canoe back across.  Then he went home -- nor was anyone
likely to see him again.  He still lives there.

There at the maiden's lodge Coyote continued to laugh and laugh.  "That he should think, 'Let me marry by prerogative!'" he declared.  Thus Coyote
played a practical joke on Bat.  But when did Coyote ever show respect for anyone?
All Rights Reserved
Bear and Raccoon Boy

A Nez Perce Legend
Raccoon Boy [k'ayk'ayo' tshatswal] and his grandmother were dwelling nearby.  He would go around looking for crawfish because he was very
fond of them.  He would devour them on the spot with a crunching noise, and he never thought of saving any to take home.  Thus, one day he went
along the stream searching for crawfish when, suddenly, he felt a strange presence hovering about him.  He turned quickly and beheld a female Bear
watching him.  He was frightened, but he did not move.  He remained very still until the Bear started to come toward him.  Then he fled; he ran and
climbed up a tree in great haste.  The Bear dashed in pursuit and climbed right up the tree after him.

The Bear [xa'xats] said to him, "Nephew, something has crawled into my ear.  Take this needle and try to remove it for me."  She had many thorn
needles pinned here and there on her body.

"Oh, that she should say this!" Raccoon Boy thought.  "I will finish her with this very thing."  The Bear gave him the thorn needle, and he inserted it
gently.  But, suddenly, he plunged the needle deep into her ear and pierced her.  Oh, she fell backwards and tumbled to the ground.  She moaned a few
moments [''an, an''] and was dead.

Raccoon Boy remained very still and watched her from above.  He was afraid to descend.  "It might be that she only pretends to be dead."  He threw
pieces of bark at her.  "She is dead all right."  He descended from the tree and went home.  "Grandmother, I have killed a Bear," he informed her.

"Hush!  You speak of a very fearsome one."

"Yes, but I have already killed her.  Come, let us go to carve her."  Now they went, and truly enough there lay the Bear.  Raccoon Boy and his
grandmother then carved the body, packed the meat, and took it home.  There they put it to roast in a fire pit; they made a barbecue.

Now just as they had arranged everything, the boy's grandmother accidentally gashed her hand with a knife.  "Oh, grandson, I have cut my hand."

"Let me see," replied Raccoon Boy.  "Ha, you are on your moon time.  You will blight my hunting power.  Hurry and build for yourself a separate
lodge."

"No, grandson, I have only cut my hand."

"Hurry and build a lodge.  You are on your moon time," insisted Raccoon Boy.  And now she went off to the side and built a lodge to which she moved
her things and where she stayed in isolation.

Alone now, Raccoon Boy went over to the barbecue and found that it had roasted to perfection.  At the roasting pit he began to eat Bear meat, and
while doing so he started a deception.  He began to talk loudly to himself, "Oh, you have come just in time.  I killed a Bear, and here I've roasted it in
this pit."  He talked to himself in this manner to give his grandmother the impression that some people had come.  Thus she would not suspect that he
had eaten all the roast by himself.  Raccoon Boy lied, "Oh yes!  Of course, take some along with you."  But there he sat and ate.  "Wait!  You have gone
off and left your dog."  Here he quickly ran a little distance away and whistled for an imaginary dog.  He returned at once and said, "Yes, now he
follows you."

He ate up all the meat, and even sucked the marrow from the bones.  He had deprived his grandmother by his gluttony.  Then he went over to her and
said, "We had guests and their voracity has deprived us of food.  They have taken all.  But now you may return to the lodge."  His grandmother took
her things and went back to their lodge.

Presently she went over to the roasting pit.  "Oh, here is some marrow still left," she exclaimed.

"Let me see, grandmother," and Raccoon Boy rushed over to her, took the bone, and began to suck out the marrow ["ts'ox, ts'ox, ts'ox"].

His grandmother now became offended, and she began to suspect him.

"Very likely not guests ate up all the meat."  Then she, the poor offended one, gnawed at the bones.  The grandmother was deeply offended.  "Now I
leave him."  And she left, taking a bearskin with her.  She went to a large patch of brush, and there she lay down in Bear fashion with the skin
wrapped around her.

Soon the boy became lonely.  "My grandmother has gone somewhere.  Perhaps she went to dig roots."  He spent the evening alone.  He became
frightened and so lonely that he cried.  He began to chant weepingly, "Hurry, hurry, oh hurry.  Evening shadows come, and my grandmother will
then come home from digging."  He spent the evening in lonely silence.  That night he cried himself to sleep.  On the following morning at dawn, he
was still alone.  The day passed.  Now he thought, "I must have offended my grandmother.  I will go to search for her."

He went; he looked for his grandmother.  Then he saw smoke curling up from a dense patch of brush.  "Ah, then she is here making dried root loaf for
me."

Now Raccoon Boy pushed his way into the brush patch.  He began to call out as he went along.  "Grandmother!  Grandmother!  Are you making
dried root loaf for me?"  He heard a growl ["wo, wo"] as he pushed his way deeper into the brush.

The grandmother heard him coming.  Then she saw him approaching.  She lay there.  Raccoon Boy came up to her, and then very suddenly she
sprang to her feet.  "Why should I be making dried root loaf for you?  In a short time the human race will come, and then they will say about you,
'There is Raccoon Boy looking for crawfish.  He deprived his grandmother of food by his gluttony.'"  Now she rushed furiously at the boy and crushed
him to death in her jaws.
Bear Leads A Boy Astray

A Nez Perce Legend
A boy was out hunting, as he was accustomed to be, when Bear ]xa'xats] captured him.  She took him into her den and kept him there for a long, long
time.  One day she said to him, "You are going home to your mother and father.  You are to go home for only a short time, and then you will return
again."  Bear prepared a lunch for him.  It happened to be in the root digging season, and she prepared camas roots for his lunch.  She repeated her
instructions, "You are just going to visit them briefly.  Then, tomorrow or the day after, you will return.  Now, in going you must make a singing
approach."

The young man's father and mother had, of course, come to believe that their son was dead.  Bear gave him a song, and he set out.  He traveled
along; and when he was about to arrive he began to sing, "Sa'ya [the bear's name], the widow, led me astray; sa'ya, the mouth, led me astray."  His
parents now heard the song, and they rejoiced to find that their son was alive and that he had returned home.

The young man stayed with his father and mother for a few days.  Then he said to them, "I came only to visit you, and now I am going back."  It
happened that the people there were catching many salmon.  Now they gave the young man a large supply of salmon to take with him.  He set out for
home and arrived at the bear den to find Bear absent.  She had gone out to dig roots.  The young man decided, "Let me provide food for the poor one."  
He broiled a salmon for her.

Bear arrived soon.  "Oh, salmon!  That is wonderful!" she exclaimed.  "There is some I have already broiled for you," the young man told her.  "Oh, it
is so overly cooked!  I can't eat it like that," she told him.  "Then I will eat it myself, and you can cook some in whatever way you like."

"Yes, you eat that," Bear agreed, and then she took a salmon and sprinkled it with dust to season it.  "This is how it should be done.  Oh, such good
salmon," she said.

Now the young man said to her, "They told me that we should come, that they are catching so many salmon and that we ought to come."  "But there
are so many people there.  It would be so embarrassing," Bear demurred.  "Be that as it may, they are inviting us.  We could go just for a short time,"
the young man replied.

"So be it, then; we will go," she consented.  Here they prepared for their visit.  Bear went out to dig camas roots to take with them.  They were ready to
go, at last.  They went; they arrived.  There were many, many people encamped, and they were making merry.  They had all kinds of social activities.  
Bear's husband joined in the festivity.  He danced, and he participated in all their various activities.

One day Bear said to her husband, "Let us go home now."  "Not just yet.  Let us go later," he replied.  Bear persisted but her husband seemed most
reluctant to leave.  He kept putting her off.

At last Bear became angry.  She knew that certain maidens were making merry with her husband.  She decided, "I will kill them."  She went out of
camp into the brush.  It was the season in which chokeberries and serviceberries were ripening, and the maidens used to go out frequently to pick and
eat berries.  Bear saw a party of maidens walking away from camp.  She circled around them and lay down in the bushes ahead, near the path of
their approach.  She could hear them very clearly.  They were talking excitedly to one another.

"And Bear's husband was giving me such special attention at the dance," one maiden was saying.  When Bear heard her husband's name mentioned,
a sudden deep hatred possessed her.  "This is why he is always so unwilling to go!  This is why he is always telling me, 'We will go late; we will go
later,'" Bear mumbled in deep anger.  The maidens came on.  When they were near Bear, she jumped up and rushed at them.  She bit one to death; she
rushed at another one and bit her to death.  Thus she killed all five of the maidens.  Now she dug a pit and buried them.  She was covered with blood,
and even though she washed herself thoroughly, there was a pungent odor of blood about her.  Then she tied a bandage around her head and went
home.  She lay down in the manner of one who is ill.

Her husband came into their lodge soon.  Observing her apparent condition he asked, "What is the matter?"  There was a heavy odor of blood in the
lodge.  "My head aches, and I was bleeding from the nose.  I feel as if I am about to become very ill.  I believe that we should go home," Bear replied.

The people about camp now had noticed the absence of the maidens, and at once they suspected Bear.  They searched for the maidens and found
where Bear had buried them.  "There is no question about it now.  Bear has killed them," the people agreed.  And now Coyote pronounced judgement.  
"Bear has killed those five sisters.  This woman who is a newcomer may no do such a thing; therefore, she, too, must be killed," he ruled.

Then the people went to Bear's husband and said to him, "The salmon are not running.  We have not caught a single one lately.  But we believe that
your wife, Bear, being a powerful shaman, by taking a sweat bath would be able to cause salmon to run again."  The husband now told the Bear
what had been proposed.

"So embarrassing!" she exclaimed.

"Yes, but they are placing all their faith in you, and they have confidence in nobody else.  Then, if you should cause a run of salmon, we should receive
such a large quantity of dried salmon to take home."

"But so embarrassing!" repeated Bear.

"Then go into the sweat-house fully clothed," offered her husband.  "All right, then I will do this for them," Bear consented at last.  The people heated
stones.  Bear repaired to the sweat-house and there, fully clothed, she crawled in.  The re-hot stones had already been piled inside.  Then the people
made a hole in the roof of the sweat lodge directly above the hot stones.  Everybody gathered around.  Now they began to pour water through the
hole, and the red-hot stones gave off a terrific heat.

Inside, Bear said to herself, "Now they will kill me!"  She began to writhe and struggle in the agony of death.  The people poured and poured water
through the hole, and they all crowded around and sat on the sweat-house to hold Bear inside.  She struggled in agony; she struggled fiercely from
the suffocating heat.  Her struggles ceased at last.  She was suffocated.  Then the people dragged her out of the sweat-house.  She was dead.  The
people continued to live there.   
Bears and Coyote

A Nez Perce Legend
Many people were dwelling in their permanent camp.  Among them was a modest, well-behaved Maiden [ipnalapqa' tmay].  She lived at the young
maidens' lodge, and nobody about camp ever saw her.  One night this Modest Maiden got up, went outside, and urinated.  But nearby stood Lynx
[qa' hap].  The Maiden went back to the lodge, and now Lynx went over to where she had been and urinated on the same spot.  Days passed.  The
Modest Maiden became pregnant.

Then the people would ask her, "Whose is it?"

She would reply, "I don't know," because she did not know what Lynx had done.  Her child was born, a baby boy.  At once the baby seemed to miss
his father and began to cry and cry, and nobody could make it stop.

And now Coyote [itsaya' ya] decreed, "We, all who are men, will assemble, and one by one we will take the baby in our arms.  Whichever of us will
cause it to stop crying will thereby be identified as the father.  The baby is only crying for its father."

All the men assembled and sat in a row.  Coyote procured some marrow from the bone of a deer.  He thought, "I will have the baby suck the marrow,
and it will stop crying."  The men began to pass the child from one to another.  It was passed down the row, but continued to cry.

Now came Coyote's turn, and he stuffed marrow into the baby's mouth.  "Ah, then it was mine," Coyote exclaimed as the baby suddenly stopped
crying.

But Fox [tili' ptsxi'] interjected, "What are you doing to it?  You will cause the baby to choke!  What are you putting in its mouth?"

"Confound you!  Must you invariably interfere?  As if it could be your baby!" Coyote berated Fox.  While the two were scolding each other, the baby
began to cry.  Now the men began to pass it along down the row.

Lynx, timorous, sat toward the end of the row.  He rather suspected, "Very likely it is mine," because he happened to remember the night he had seen
the Modest Maiden urinating.  The people now observed, "There is Lynx."

Coyote said, "Ho!  When even I could not make the child hush, how can one such as he do it?  But give it to him, then."  The baby was handed to Lynx.  
The moment Lynx took it in his arms the crying stopped, and there were only deep sobs of contentment ["Iak', lak"] from the baby.

"Oh, Lynx is its father!" exclaimed the men in amazement.  [This incident predestined a practice.  She who is considered by others to be superior and
difficult to win in marriage, she who considers herself better than other women, she will be taken in marriage by a homely and poor man.]

So Coyote nourished a deep animosity toward Lynx.  He proclaimed to all the people, "One test is not enough to establish the child as Lynx's.  There is
another way by which we will find out definitely whose baby this is.  We men will pack in from the hunt to the mother, and whoever will bring in his
pack first will establish himself and win her for his wife.  Tomorrow morning everybody will go out hunting."  Coyote made this pronouncement out
of indignation, but all the men heeded his words because he was the hunting chief.

As soon as Coyote had finished his announcement, he went surreptitiously out of camp to hunt.  He had decided, "Let me kill my game this evening
and hide it away for tomorrow."  He shot a young deer, packed it, and hid it in a tree near camp.  "Tomorrow, very early, I will take this and present
it.  I will be the first to arrive, for how could anyone bring in his game so early?" Coyote said to himself.  The night passed, and dawn came.

Lynx decided, "I too will go hunting."  He went out of his lodge, plucked a whisker, and stuck it in the ground.  At once a heavy fog arose, a dense
impenetrable to the vision.  He went off a short distance and shot a great antlered buck.  He packed the meat and brought it to the woman.

Meanwhile, Coyote went forth to get his tree-cache.  He searched around in the fog.  "I thought I put it here.  Perhaps someone found it," he
deliberated.  He continued to search and search among the pine trees, but his pack was not to be found.  He would look up into the trees, but the fog
was too thick for him to see clearly.  But as soon as Lynx had carried in and presented his meat to the woman, the fog suddenly cleared.  Now when
Coyote looked where he had been searching about, suddenly he saw his tree-cache as the fog lifted.  "There it has been all the time; I just didn't see it,"
he said to himself as he began to take down the pack.  "How could anyone have brought in his kill under these conditions?  I will be the first to arrive."
 He started off toward camp with his pack.

Just as he was arriving, he met some boys, his own children.  They shouted, "Oh, our father packs in from the hunt!"

"Be silent!  I am taking this to the woman," Coyote told them.  Now the boys informed him, "But another person packed in to her long ago, early this
morning, while it was foggy."

Upon hearing this, Coyote ran along and found that Lynx had won.  In deep indignation, Coyote thought, "She will not be his wife."

The people, however, were saying, "The woman becomes Lynx's wife, for he has outdone us twice."

In his hatred Coyote now went to the flying people and said to them, "You are all splendid men, and it is not right that this good woman should
become the wife of a destitute and loathsome man."  [The woman was a vireo.]  Coyote talked to the flying people for a long time, and now they were
convinced.

They said, "Yes, there is no question about it; Lynx should not be allowed to take a good woman of our kind from us.  Thus we, too, are angry at him,
and we will kill him.  It is as you say that Lynx is no good."

Meanwhile, Lynx had begun to fear for his safety.  He knew that Coyote did not think well of him, so he said to his wife, "If anyone should kill me,
and even if they should pound me to a pulp, you must look for remains.  Find even a very little piece of my body, wrap it in buckskin, and put it under
your pillow."  A few days later the flying people set upon Lynx and killed him.  Eagle [wa' ptas], Robin [wi' tspiyaqs], Bobolink [timu' ytimuy] and all
knew that Lynx had strong powers of resurrection.  To preclude any such occurrence, they pounded him to a pulp, mixed the flesh with dirt, and
ground up all, even the bones, to a pulp.

Now all the people broke camp and moved away.  Coyote went to the woman and said, "Now that Lynx is dead, you must come with me.  The people
are moving away, and you will do pitifully here all alone.  You will do poorly by your child.  Let me take the child, and let us go.  Someday you will
find another man, and why do you need to keep thinking of that ugly Lynx?"  Coyote tried to convince her to go with him, but she did not heed him.  
She sprang up into a tree and became a bird again.  She gave her bird calls, and she wept.  Coyote coaxed her, "Why do you feel such a deep
attachment to him?  I can take care of you just as well as he could have.  Do come down."  But she did not move.  Coyote at last gave up hope and left
her.

When all the people had moved away, she came down out of the tree.  She went to the place where Lynx had been killed, and she searched around for
a piece of his body.  But every part seemed to have been too finely pulverized, and nothing remained.  She kept looking, and after a long search
managed to find a very small piece of bone.  She took the little fragment and wrapped it in buckskin.  Now she erected a lodge and lived there.  In
about ten days she heard a noise, a stirring, in the buckskin packet that she kept under her pillow.  It sounded as if someone were groaning very
faintly.  Then each day the moaning became more distinctly audible.

One day she heard a voice from within the packet say, "Untie me now.  I'm in a suffocating place, and I'm getting cramped."  The woman unwrapped
the packet, and Lynx emerged.  Oh, he had sores all over his body.  He said to his wife, "Go and make a bathing place for me."  She did his bidding.  
Now Lynx began to sweat bath continually.  He got better; he got stronger.

One day Coyote decided, "How is it that nobody has gone to see the woman?  I wonder how she has been getting along.  I will go and take a look."  
He set out, and traveling along he saw a column of smoke.  He crept up and saw a man sweat bathing --it was Lynx.

Recognizing him, Coyote approached and said, "Ah, friend, so you have recovered.  I am very, very glad.  At the time they attacked you, I told them
point-blank, 'Do not do this to him.'  But they were insistent, and they killed you.  It was on Bear's [xa' xats] orders their action was founded; he
caused them to attack you.  And now it is for you to avenge yourself.  When I told them, 'Leave Lynx alone,' they did not heed me.  Now I say it is for
you to avenge yourself."  Coyote returned home.

The men were getting ready to go on a hunt, and Coyote began to officiate.  "You go this direction, and you over this way to there.  My nephews, the
young bears, will go in this other direction past the place which is called, 'The- place- where- one- seems- to- be- aiming [nika' kunwaku's].'  You
bears will see a figure that appears to be aiming right at you, but think nothing of it.  Do not be alarmed and think, 'Someone is about to shoot us.'"

Their father, old Bear, thought, "I have never, never heard that name."  And now became suspicious and alarmed because he had never in all his
travels, and he had been in every part of the country, heard of or seen a place where a figure appeared to be aiming at anyone.

Coyote continued his hunting instructions.  "My brother Bear and I will go up the valley opposite each other."  Coyote was thinking, "I will be able to
run away very conveniently the moment it is found out that my lies have caused the death of the young bears."  All the hunters went forth to their
assignments.  Bear was suspicious and worried.

The young bears went along their designated route.  Soon they saw a figure.  "It looks like a person, and it is aiming right at us," they commented.  
"Yes, but our uncle told us it isn't really a person," they added.  But there stood Lynx, bow raised, aiming right at the approaching bears.  His arrow
was one of his whiskers.  Now he shot; he hit all five of them.  His arrow, penetrating from one to another, pinned them together.

But a Martin [ispa' c'ax] had been following the bears, and the arrow struck him a glancing blow on the hip, tearing off a chunk of flesh.  He fled
from there, carrying the report news.  "Paq' paq'paq'", "Coyote with his lies has caused the five young bears to be exterminated!" he shouted as he fled.

"Brother," Coyote said to Bear as they went along up the valley, "brother they are shouting that the game is heading down the valley."

\"No," Bear replied, "they are saying something else.  Wait, let me listen."  The shouting was heard again, "Coyote's lies have caused the death of the
five young bears!"

This time Bear heard aright.  He turned to Coyote and said, "Coyote, see where the sun now stands; you are now dead.  Whatever form you may
assume in your trickery, for you are like that, Coyote, I am going to kill you.  Take a last look at the land; you are seeing it for the last time."  Now
Bear and Coyote began to fight.  Bear shot Coyote on the forehead; but the arrow glanced off and only tore off a piece of skin.

"The homely one has shot me!" Coyote shouted, and he fled.  The blood poured out of the wound.  The people who had been watching said, "Bear is
killing poor Coyote."

"Huh, not such a one as he!  Coyote is powerful.  He and I will soon be pit-cooking Bear," Fox told them.  Coyote fled; he ran with the intensity of a
breaking tendon.  The blood trickled from his wound.

Bear shouted after him, "You may run away, but I will not stop chasing you until I have bitten you to death!"

Coyote ran far ahead and going along, charmed himself, "Let there be a foul, dingy lodge, an old, filthy lodge that has stood since the origin of the
land.  Let it be covered with ashes and stained with smoke.  Let there be a dirty dog, sick and covered with sores.  And let me become an old man, an
old man hideously loathsome, verminous, and so repulsive that nobody would suffer to bite me to death or even to touch me.  Let me be ill abed there."

Coyote invoked his powers in this way as he ran, and as Bear came on.  Coyote continued, "Then let there be a deep flood channel, a waterway with
banks so steep that nothing could possibly climb out of the water.  Let there be a piece of timber spanning this channel in the manner of a bridge, and
let drops of blood be splattered across it."

As he ran along, he saw the lodge which he had prescribed for himself up ahead.  He rushed forward, entered the lodge, and lay writhing and gasping
from exhaustion.  Then quickly he threw ashes all over his body.  He was very scared.  In a few moments he heard the approaching footsteps and the
angry snorting of Bear.  The fury of Bear's pursuit was terrific.  Inside, Coyote was gripped by fear in the thought, "He will recognize me and bite me
to death."  He almost jumped up to run away, but he managed to control himself.  "I will remain here," he vowed.  Bear rushed up to the lodge, and the
dog barked furiously at him.  "You, Coyote, whatever form you may assume, I am bound to bite you to death.  You are a vile person, Coyote," Bear
raved as he pushed open the door of the dilapidated lodge.  Then he suddenly beheld the dirty, old, bedridden man.  It was a revolting sight, and Bear
halted at the door.  "Old man, have you heard anything pass by here?" he asked.

"Well, there was something going along.  I heard the dog barking, but I wasn't very able to get up to see who it was," the old man replied.

"I am chasing Coyote because he caused the death of my five children, and I am determined to catch him and bite him to death," Bear explained.

"Yes.  I understand.  It is too bad what he has done to your children.  Coyote has always been a villain and a troublemaker," commented the old man.

"Coyote is a vile person, indeed," said Bear.

"Yes, I heard someone going past, and the dog barked at him.  Perhaps he crossed over the bridge.  There is a bridge there, you know.  When you
cross over, you must watch yourself because the timber is aslant," the old man said.  "Yes, he must have gone over the bridge.  I was tracking him by
a trail of blood.  Perhaps there are drops of blood on the bridge," replied Bear.

"Yes, perhaps there are.  Let me go with you to the bridge, and I will hold it steady for you to cross," offered the old man.  He got out of bed with the
greatest difficulty and followed Bear.  There they saw a trail of blood on the footbridge.

Bear said, "Yes, he went across here all right, and now I will take up the chase again."  "Yes, you certainly ought to kill him," the old man encouraged
him.  Bear began to edge his way across the bridge.

The old man held the timber steady and cautioned Bear, "Be careful.  This footbridge has always been aslant."  Bear crept along, and just as he
reached the middle, the old man suddenly tipped the plank.  Bear gasped and toppled into the water below.  Coyote danced around and shouted in
glee, "Why did you think there would be an old man living here?  Now I am going to kill you!"

Bear pleaded with him, "Coyote, let me live!  Do not kill me!  Now it is established that you are more powerful than I, and you can let me live!"

But Coyote only gloated, "We were angry at each other, and you told me, 'Look at the land for the last time.'  Now, I tell you the same thing because I
am going to kill you."  Bear pleaded and begged for his life, but Coyote only took an arrow and shot him dead.  The body floated down with the
current.

Then Coyote made another pronouncement.  "Let there be a plain, and let Bear's body float ashore there."  Now he went along down the water
channel, and here it has floated ashore.  Then Coyote and Fox made a great barbecue; they pit-cooked the bear meat.  Meanwhile Bear's wife ran
away and hid.  She was afraid of Coyote because he had already killed six of her family.  
Chipmunk and Snake

A Nez Perce Legend
Chipmunk and Snake lived together.  Their fire was one long burning log.  Each of them has a stick with which to poke the fire.  Chipmunk poked the
fire:  "U ya had ya ha."  Snake poked it.  "Winter" was the noise he made.  When the log was burned through the middle, it would be spring.  
Chipmunk was hurrying it to make spring come quicker.  Snake was trying to delay it because he wanted winter.  The only time they ceased arguing
was when they slept.  At dawn, as soon as they woke up they took up the stick.  Suddenly, the Chipmunk said, "I'll go outside and see."

She went out the door.  Already the ground was clear of snow.  Small blades of grass showed through.  She nibbled them.  She went in again and took
up her stick to poke the fire.  Snake said, "Is it clear yet?"  "No, there is still snow on the ground."  Then Snake repeated, "Winter."  Suddenly he said,
"You smell of green grass."  "No, it's that mat you smell.  I just turned it over."

Outside all was green.  "Tsatapi," spoke Snake.  "Ya ya," said Chipmunk.  Patsata, Chipmunk ran out.  Snake said, "My!  She does smell of green
grass!"

Then he went out.  The ground was clear.  Sun was shining.  Snake ate grass and curled himself up on the ground.

The end of my road.
Coyote and Porcupine

A Nez Perce Legend
Once Porcupine was going along the river bank looking for food.  Soon he saw some fine, fat buffalo, ten of them, just across the river.  Then
Porcupine wanted to get across the river, but could not.  After some thought he called to the buffalo to stand in line.  This was so that he could tell
which one was the fattest.  Then he picked out the fattest one and told him to swim across the river.  When this buffalo came up to Porcupine, he asked
Porcupine where he wanted to sit, on his back or on his tail.  Porcupine answered, "I would rather be under your forelegs, so I shall not drown."

The buffalo agreed.  When they were nearly across, Porcupine struck the buffalo under the foreleg with a large knife.  So he killed that buffalo, but the
others ran away.

Porcupine was looking for something with which to sharpen his knife.  He was singing, "I wish I could find something with which to sharpen my
knife, for I haven't had any fat buffalo yet."  Now, Coyote happened to be going by and he heard Porcupine singing.  Coyote came up to him and
Porcupine was afraid.  Coyote asked him what he was singing, and Porcupine answered, "I was not singing anything, I was just saying I wish I had
some string for my moccasin."  Coyote said, "No, you did not say that; I heard what you said."  Porcupine said nothing more; so Coyote told him
what he had killed.  Coyote said, "Now, I have a sharp knife, so I can help you."  Then Coyote said, "Let us try jumping over the buffalo; the one who
jumps over may have it all.  I'll try first."  Coyote succeeded, but Porcupine did not, so Coyote got all the meat.  Then Coyote took his sharp knife and
cut Porcupine's head, but did not kill him.

Now, Coyote had some children:  one of them was with him, and the rest were at home.  Coyote said to his child, "I am going after the other children.  
You watch the old Porcupine, and if he gets up you call me and I will come back and kill him."  When Coyote was gone, Porcupine got up.  The young
Coyote cried, "Father, Porcupine is up."  Then Coyote hurried back and asked his baby what the matter was.  The child said, "He was trying to take
some of the buffalo meat, but now he is quiet again."  Coyote started off a second time.

When he was a great way off Porcupine got up.  The child called his father, but this time in vain.  Porcupine struck the young Coyote with a stone and
killed him.  Then he set the child up under a tree and stuffed his mouth full of buffalo fat.  Then Porcupine took all the meat to the top of a tree and
watched for Coyote and his family to come.

When Coyote with his wife and children had come up close, Coyote said to the children, "Look at your brother, he is eating and having a great time."  
But when they arrived they saw that the baby was killed and had his mouth stuffed with fat.  Then Coyote was very angry.  He wondered where
Porcupine had gone.  When Coyote looked up he saw Porcupine sitting in a tall tree laughing.  Coyote said, "Please come down"; but Porcupine
answered, "I do not like you because you are trying to cheat me out of my buffalo meat."  Coyote said, "Just give us a little piece of fat or meat."  Then
Porcupine told Coyote and his family to all stand together under the tree.  They did this.  Then Porcupine dropped the buffalo head down on them and
they were all killed.
Coyote and the Mallard Ducks

A Nez Perce Legend
Coyote was traveling up the river when he saw five mallard duck girls swimming on the other side.  He hid himself in the bushes and became aroused
right away.  Then he thought out a plan to satisfy himself.

Coyote lengthened his penis and let it fall into the river.  It floated on top of the water.  Coyote didn't like this, so he pulled it back in and tied a rock to it
to keep it below the surface of the water.  He threw his penis back in and tied a smaller rock to it.  This was just right.  It floated just below the surface
of the water, where no one could see it.  He sent it across to where the girls were swimming.  He began copulating with the oldest girl.

Now, these girls did not know what was wrong with their older sister, the way she was moving around in the water and making strange sounds.

Then they saw what was happening and they grabbed the penis and tried to pull it out.  When they couldn't, they got out on the bank and held down
their older sister and tried to pull it out that way, but they couldn't and they began laughing about it.

When Coyote had satisfied himself, he called over to the girls and said, "My sisters, what is the problem over there?"  They told him.  He said, "Cut the
thing off with some wire grass."

They did, and Coyote cut the other end off where he was and the middle section of the penis fell in the river and became a ledge.

The eldest girl became ill then.  Coyote went down the river a short distance, swam across and then came upstream to the girls' camp where the oldest
girl was almost dead.

The girls recognized Coyote and said, "Coyote, the medicine man, has come."  They asked him to cure the sick girls.  He told them that he would do it,
but they had to close up all the chinks in the lodge so no one could see it and steal his medicine by watching.  He told them to leave him alone with the
girl for a while.

He got the sisters together around the lodge and told them to sing a song and keep time on a log with sticks.  "Keep time on the log very carefully, for
now I am going to take it out."  Coyote began singing, "I will stick it back on, I will stick it back on."

He went into the lodge and copulated again with the mallard duck girl and recovered the end of his penis.  The girl was cured.

After that everyone said the medicine of Coyote was very powerful.
Coyote and the Monster of Kamiah

A Nez Perce Legend
This story tells how Coyote made the different people, including the Nez Perce, and how certain animals came to look as they do today.  Without
Coyote's cleverness in outwitting the monster, the people and animals today would still be imprisoned in the Monster's belly.

Once upon a time, Coyote was tearing down the waterfall at Celilo and building a fish ladder, so that salmon could go upstream for the people to catch.
 He was very busy at this, when someone shouted to him, "Why are you doing that?  All the people are gone now because the Monster has eaten them."

"Well," said Coyote to himself, "then I'll stop doing this because I was doing it for the people, and they are gone.  Now I'll go along, too."

From there he went upstream, by way of the Salmon River country.  As he was walking along, he stepped on the leg of Meadowlark and broke it.  
Meadowlark got mad and shouted, "Lima, lima, lima!  What chance do you have of finding people, walking along like this?"

Coyote said, "My Aunt!  Please tell me what is happening, and I will make for you a new leg from the wood of a chokecherry tree."

So the Meadowlark told him, "Already all the people have been swallowed by the Monster."

Coyote replied, "Well, that is where I, too, am going."  Then he fixed Meadowlark's leg with a chokecherry branch.  From there, he traveled on.  Along
the way he took a good bath, saying to himself, "I will make myself tasty to the Monster."  Then he dressed himself all up, saying, "This is so he won't
vomit me up."  Coyote tied himself with rawhide rope to three great mountains, Tuhm-lo-yeets-mekhs (Pilot Knob), Se-sak-khey-mekhs (Seven Devil's
Mountain), and Ta-ya-mekhs (Cottonwood Butte).  After the people came, these same mountains were used by young men and women as special
places to seek the wey-a-kin, or spirit who helped guide them through life.

From there, Coyote went along the mountains and over the ridges.  Suddenly, he saw a great head.  He quickly hid himself in the grass and gazed at it.  
Never before in his life had he seen anything like it.  The head was huge, and sweating off somewhere in the distance was its big body.  Then Coyote
shouted to him, "Oh Monster, let us inhale each other!"  The big eyes of the monster looked all around for Coyote, but did not find him, because Coyote's
body was painted with clay and was the same color as the grass.  Then Coyote shouted again, "Oh Monster, let us inhale each other!"  Coyote shook the
grass back and forth where he sat.

Suddenly the Monster saw the swaying grass and said, "Oh you Coyote, you inhale first.  You swallow me first."  So Coyote tried.  Powerfully and
noisily he drew in his breath, but the great Monster only swayed and shook.

Then Coyote said, "Now you inhale me.  You have already swallowed all the people, so you should swallow me too, so I won't be lonely."  The Monster
did not know that Coyote had a pack strapped to his back with five flintstone knives, a flint fire-making set, and some pure pitch in it.

Now the Monster inhaled like a mighty wind.  He carried Coyote right towards him, but as Coyote went, he left along the way great keh-mes (Camas
bulbs) and great serviceberry fields, saying, "Here the people will find them and will be glad, for only a short time away is the coming of the
La-te-tel-wit (Human Beings)."  Coyote almost got caught on one of the ropes, but he cut it with his knife.  Thus he dashed right into the monster's
mouth.

Along the way he saw bones scattered about, and he thought to himself, "I can see that many people have been dying."  As he went along he saw some
boys and he said to them, "Where is the Monster's heart?  Come, show me."  As they were heading that way, Grizzly Bear rushed out at them roaring.  
Coyote said, "So!  You make yourself scary only to me," and he kicked Bear on the nose.  Thus, the bear today has only a short nose.

As they went on, Rattlesnake rattled at them in fury.  "So, only towards me you are vicious.  We are nothing but dung to you."  Then he stomped on
Rattlesnake's head, and flattened it out.  It is still that way.

Coyote then met Brown Bear who said, "I see the Monster has kept you for last.  Hah!  I'd like to see you try to save your people!"

But then, all along the way, people began to greet Coyote and talk to him.  His close friend, Fox greeted him from the side and said, "The Monster is so
dangerous.  What are you going to do to him?"

Coyote told him, "You and the boys go find some wood or anything that will burn."

About this time, Coyote had arrived at the heart of the Monster.  He cut off slabs of fat from the great heart and threw them to the people.  "It's too bad
you are hungry.  Here, eat this."  Coyote now started a fire with his flint, and smoke drifted up through the Monster's eyes, nose, ears, and anus.

The Monster said, "Oh you Coyote!  That's why I didn't trust you.  Let me cast you out."

Coyote said, "If you do, people will later say, 'He who was cast out is giving salmon to the people."'  "Well, then, go out through the nose," the Monster
said.  "But then they will say the same thing."  "well, then, go out through the ears," the Monster said.

"If I do," answered Coyote, "they will say, 'There is old ear-wax giving food to the people.'"

"Hn, hn, hn, Oh you coyote!  This is why I didn't trust you.  Then, go out through the anus."

And Coyote replied, "Then people will say, 'Old feces is giving food to the people.'"

The fire was now burning near the Monster's heart, and he began to feel the pain.  Coyote began cutting away on the heart, but then broke one f his
stone knives.  Right away he took another knife and kept cutting, but soon that one broke, too.  Coyote then said to the people, "Now gather up all the
bones around here and carry them to the eyes, ears, mouth, and anus of the Monster.  Pile them up, and when he falls dead, kick them out the
openings."  With the third knife he began cutting away at the heart.  The third knife broke, and then the fourth, leaving only one more.  He told the
people, "All right, get yourselves ready because as soon as he falls dead, each one of you must go out through the opening that is closest to you.  Take
the old women and old men close to the openings so that they may get out easily."

Now the heart hung by only a small piece of muscle and Coyote was cutting away on it, using his last stone knife.  The Monster's heart was still barely
hanging when Coyote's last knife broke.  Coyote then threw himself on the heart, just barely tearing it loose with his hands.  Then the Monster died and
opened up all the openings of his body.  The people kicked the bones out and then went out themselves.  Coyote went out, too.

The Monster fell dead and the anus began closing, but Muskrat was still inside.  Just as the anus closed he squeezed out, barely getting his body out, but
his tail was caught.  He pulled and pulled and all the hair got pulled right off it.  Coyote scolded him, "Now what were you doing?  You probably
thought of something to do at the last minute.  You're always behind in everything."

Then Coyote told the people, "Gather up all the bones and arrange them well."  They did this.  Then Coyote said, "Now we are going to cut up the
Monster."  Coyote smeared blood on his hands and sprinkled this blood on the bones.  Suddenly there came to life again all those who had died while
inside the Monster.  Everyone carved up the great Monster and Coyote began dealing out parts of the body to different areas of the country all over the
land, towards the sunrise, towards the sunset, towards the north, and towards the south.  Where each part landed, he named a tribe and describes
what their appearance would be.  The Cayuse were formed and became small and hot tempered.  The Flatheads got a flat headed appearance.  The
Blackfeet became tall, slender, and war-like.  The Coeur d'Alene and their neighbors to the north became skillful gamblers.  The Yakima became short
and stocky and were good fishermen.

He used up the entire body of the Monster in this way.  Then Fox came up to Coyote and said, "What is the meaning of this, Coyote?  You have used up
the body of the Monster and given it to far away lands, but have given yourself nothing for this area."

"Well," snorted Coyote, "Why didn't you tell me this before?  I was so busy that I didn't think of it."  Then he turned to the people and said, "Bring me
some water with which to wash my hands."  He washed his hands and made the water bloody.  Then with this bloody water, he threw drops over the
land around him and said, "You may be little people, but you will be powerful.  You will be little because I did not give you enough of the Monster's
body, but you will be very brave and intelligent and will work hard.  In only a short time, the La-te-tel-wit (Human Beings) are coming.  And you will
be known as the Nu-me-poo (later referred to as Nez Perce), or Tsoop-nit-pa-lu (People Crossing over into the Divide).  Thus, the Nu-me-poo Nation
was born.  Today the heart and liver of the Monster are to be found in the beautiful Kamiah Valley in Idaho, the home of the Nez Perce tribe.  Thus, the
beginning of the La-te-tel-wit (Human Beings) was at hand.
Coyote Creates Human Beings

A Nez Perce Legend
One day, long before there were any people on the Earth, a monster came down from the North.  He was a huge monster and he ate everything in sight.
 He ate all the little animals, the chipmunks and the raccoons and the mice, and all the big animals.  He ate the deer and the elk and even the mountain
lion.

Coyote couldn't find any of his friends any more and this made him very mad.  He decided the time had come to stop the monster.

Coyote went across the Snake River and tied himself to the highest peak in the Wallowa Mountains.  Then he called out to the monster on the other side
of the river.  He challenged the monster to try and eat him.

The monster charged across the river and up into the mountains.  He tried as hard as he could to suck Coyote off the mountain with his breath but it
was no use.  Coyote's rope was too strong.

This frightened the monster.  He decided to make friends with Coyote and he invited Coyote to come and stay with him for awhile.

One day Coyote told the monster he would like to see all of the animals in the monster's belly.  The monster agreed and let Coyote go in.

When he went inside, Coyote saw that all the animals were safe.  He told them to get ready to escape and set about his work.  With his fire starter he
built a huge fire in the monster's stomach.  Then he took his knife and cut the monster's heart down.  The monster died a great death and all the animals
escaped.  Coyote was the last one out.

Coyote said that in honor of the event he was going to create a new animal, a human being.  Coyote cut the monster up in pieces and flung the pieces to
the four winds.  Where each piece landed, some in the North, some to the South, others to the East and West, in valleys and canyons and along the
rivers, a tribe was born.  It was in this way that all the tribes came to be.

When he was finished, Coyote's friend, Fox said that no tribe had been created on the spot where they stood.  Coyote was sorry he had no more parts,
but then he had an idea.  He washed the blood from his hands with water and sprinkled the drops on the ground.

Coyote said, "Here on this ground I make the Nez Perce.  They will be few in number, but they will be strong and pure."  And this is how the human
beings came to be.
Cry Because He Had No Wife

A Nez Perce Legend
Once there was a little boy.  He was an orphan.  This boy cried day and night and would never be quiet.  His grandmother asked him one day, "What
makes you cry?"

He said, "I cry because I want a wife."

Now his grandparents knew of a girl who lived toward the East and they sent him there.

As he went along the trail, he came to a giant's house.  He went in to see the giant, who asked him to stay to breakfast.  The giant had five roast on the
fire.  He had four large roasts and one small one.  He said to the boy, "Pick out the roast you want for breakfast."  The boy picked out the small roast.

Now, the four large roasts were the legs of people that the giant had killed.  The small roast was venison.  The boy knew this from what his
grandmother had told him.  She said, "Never eat too much."

After breakfast he went on.  On the road he came to a great rock cliff.  Its name was Cliff-Giant and it crushed people.  The other giant had told him of
this one, and how to get by it.  He had said, "Turn yourself into a little dog and very slowly follow the trail under the Rock=Cliff.  Keep your eye on
Rock=Cliff.  When you see it move, run fast."  He did this and escaped.

Then he went on.  He could see at a distance the place where the girl lived.  Until he came in sight of this lodge he had never left off crying.  Now, this girl
had a great horse which would kill people before they could reach her lodge.  That was her guard.  The boy picked up tow large stones and ran, still
crying, toward the lodge.  The animal ran at the boy, but the boy spat all over one of the stones.  When the horse came close, he threw the stone behind
him.  Then the horse stopped to stamp on the stone and the boy ran on.  He was almost in reach of the lodge when he threw the other stone.  The horse
stopped to stamp on that, and the boy reached the lodge and jumped in.

Very soon the girl entered.  She knew him at  once and called him by name Iwapnep Ftswitki, Cry-Because-He-Had-No-Wife.  She talked to him and
asked him if he wanted a bath.  So she built a fire, heated water, and prepared him a bath.  When he had taken the bath be became of man's size.

Next morning they started toward his home.  When they reached this, his grandparents were very old, because he had been gone many years.  The girl
said to her husband:  "You tell your grandparents to do nothing wrong tonight.  If they obey, I will give them a bath that will make them young again."  
In the morning she did so; but they had not obeyed her directions so they did not become young again.  The next night they were both dead.

Then the girl and her husband started for her old home.  They rode back on the great horse but he did not go very well.

They made a whip out of black haw.

The whip said to them, "I can outlast all other whips."

They made a whip out of smoke-wood (Coyote-rope).

This whip said, "When the giant gets too close, throw me down and I will tangle up the giant."

They made a whip out of mud.

This whip said, "Throw me down and I will mire the giant."

They made a whip out of slide-rock.

This whip said, "throw me down and the giant will have trouble in getting by."

They made a whip out of red haw.

This whip said, "Throw me down, and I will tear the giant's flesh."

They made a whip out of big mountains.

This whip said, "Throw me down and the giant will not be able to get past me."

When they had finished all the whips, they started to pass the giant's house.  The giant rushed out and cried, "Give me your wife!"  The boy answered,
"Get me a drink of water and I will give you my wife."  When the giant went to get the water, the boy whipped up the horse and hurried on.

They had gone some ways when the giant came out.  They threw down the whip of black haw.  He almost overtook them and they threw down the whip
of smoke-wood.  It tangled up the giant until they got away.  When the giant almost overtook them again, they threw down the mud whip and he was
mired.  When the giant almost overtook them the fourth time, they threw down the slide-rock whip and the giant had great trouble in getting by.  When
the giant almost overtook them the fifth time, they threw down the re-haw whip, and it tore the flesh of the giant.  And when the giant almost overtook
them the sixth time, they threw down the whip of high mountains and he could not cross it.

Thus they escaped.
How the Beaver Stole Fire From the Pines

A Nez Perce Legend
Once before there were any people in the world, the different animals and trees lived and moved about and talked together just like human beings.

The pine trees had the secret of fire and guarded it jealously, so that no matter how cold it was, they alone could warm themselves.

At length an unusually cold winter came, and all the animals were in danger of freezing to death.  But all their attempts to discover the pines' secret were
in vain, until Beaver at last hit upon a plan.

At a certain place on the Grande Ronde River in Idaho, the pines were about to hold a great council.  They had built a large fire to warm themselves after
bathing in the icy water, and the sentinels were posted to prevent intruders from stealing their fire secret.

But Beaver had hidden under the bank near the fire before the sentries had taken their places, and when a live coal rolled down the bank, he seized it, hid
it in his breast, and ran away as fast as he could.

The pines immediately raised a hue and cry and started after him.  Whenever he was hard pressed, Beaver darted from side to side to dodge his
pursuers, and when he had a good start, he kept a straight course.

The Grande Ronde River preserves the direction Beaver took in his flight, and this is why it is tortuous in some parts of its course and straight in others.

After running for a long time, the pines grew tired.  So most of them halted in a body on the river banks, where they remain in great numbers to this
day, forming a growth so dense that hunters can hardly get through.

A few pines kept chasing Beaver, but they finally gave out one after another, and they remain scattered at intervals along the banks of the river in the
places where they stopped.

There was one cedar running in the forefront of the pines, and although he despaired of capturing Beaver, he said to the few remaining trees who were
still in the chase, "We can't catch him, but I'll go to the top of the hill yonder and see how far ahead he is."

So he ran to the top of the hill and saw Beaver just diving into Big Snake River where the Grande Ronde enters it.  Further pursuit was out of the
question.

The cedar stood and watched Beaver dart across Big Snake River and give fire to some willows on the opposite bank, and re-cross farther on and give
fire to the birches, and so on to several other kinds of trees.

Since then, all who have wanted fire have got it from these particular trees, because they have fire in them and give it up readily when their wood is
rubbed together in the ancient way.

Cedar still stands alone on the top of the hill where he stopped, near the junction of the Grande Ronde and Big Snake rivers.  He is very old, so old that
his top is dead, but he still stands as a testament to the story's truth.

That the chase was a very long one is shown by the fact that there are no cedars within a hundred miles up stream from him.  The old people point him
out to the children as they pass by.

"See," they say, "here is old Cedar standing in the very spot where he stopped chasing Beaver."    
The First Moccasins

A Nez Perce Legend
There was once a great Chief of the Plains who had very tender feet.  Other mighty chiefs laughed at him; little chiefs only smiled as he hobbled past; and
though they did not dare to smile, the people of the tribe also enjoyed the big chief's discomfort.  All of them were in the same canoe, having no horses
and only bare feet, but luckily very few of them had tender feet.  The unhappily medicine man who was advisor to the Chief-of-the-Tender-Feet was
afraid and troubled.  Each time he was called before the chief he was asked, "What are you going to do about it?"  The 'it' meant the chief's tender feet.

Forced by fear, the medicine man at last hit upon a plan.  Though he knew it was not the real answer to the chief's foot problem, nevertheless it was a
good makeshift.  The medicine man had some women of the tribe weave a long, narrow mat of reeds, and when the big chief had to go anywhere, four
braves unrolled the mat in front of him so that he walked in comfort.  One day, the braves were worn out from seeing that the chief's feet were not worn
out.  They carelessly unrolled the mat over a place where flint arrowheads had been chipped.  The arrowheads had long ago taken flight, but the
needle-sharp chips remained.  When the big chief's tender feet were wounded by these chips, he uttered a series of whoops which made the nearby aspen
tree leaves quiver so hard that they have been trembling ever since.

That night the poor medicine man was given an impossible task by the angry chief:  "Cover the whole Earth with mats so  thick that my feet will not
suffer.  If you fail, you will die when the moon is round."

The frightened maker of magic crept back to his lodge.  He did not wish to be put to death on the night of the full moon, but he could think of no way to
avoid it.  Suddenly he saw the hide of an elk which he had killed pegged to  the ground, with two women busily scraping the hair from the hide, and an
idea flashed into his groping mind.  He sent out many hunters; many women were busy for many days; many braves with hunting knives cut, and
women sewed with bone needles and rawhide sinews.

On the day before the moon was round, the medicine man went to the chief and told him that he had covered as much of the Earth as was possible in so
short a time.  When the chief looked from the door of his lodge, he saw many paths of skin stretching as far as he could see.  Long strips which could be
moved from place to place connected the main leather paths.  Even the chief thought that this time the magic of the medicine man had solved tenderfoot
transportation for all time - but this was not to be!

One day, as the big chief was walking along one of his smooth, tough leather paths, he saw a pretty maiden of the tribe gliding ahead of him, walking on
the hard Earth on one side of the chief's pathway.  She glanced back when she heard the pitter-patter of his feet on the elkhide pathway and seemed to
smile.  The chief set off on the run to catch up with her, his eyes fixed on the back of She-Who-Smiled, and so his feet strayed from the narrow path and
landed in a bunch of needle-sharp thorns!  The girl ran for her life when she heard the hideous howls of the chief, and Indians in the distant village
thought that they were being attacked by wildcats.

Two suns later, when the chief was calm enough to speak again, he had his medicine man brought before him and told the unhappy man that next day,
when the sun was high, he would be sent with all speed to the land of shadows.

That night, the medicine man climbed to the top of a high hill in search of advice from friendly spirits on how to cover the entire Earth with leather.  He
slept, and in a dream vision he was shown the answer to his problem.  Amid vivid flashes of lightning, he tore down the steep hillside, howling louder
than the big chief at times, as jagged rocks wounded his bare feet and legs.  He did not stop until he was safely inside his lodge.  He worked all night and
until the warriors who were to send him on the shadow trail came for him, just before noon the next day.  He was surrounded by the war-club armed
guards.  He was clutching close to his heart something tightly rolled in a piece of deerskin.  His cheerful smile surprised those who saw him pass.  "Wah,
he is brave!" said the men of the tribe.  "He is very brave!" said the women of the tribe.

The big chief was waiting just outside his lodge.  He gave the guard swift, stern orders.  Before the maker of magic could be led away, he asked leave to
say a few words the the chief.  "Speak!" said the chief, sorry to lose a clever medicine man who was very good at most kinds of magic.  Even the chief
knew that covering the entire Earth with leather was an impossible task.

The medicine man quickly knelt beside the chief, unrolled the two objects which he took from his bundle and slipped one of them on each foot of the chief.  
The chief seemed to be wearing a pair of bear's hairless feet, instead of bare feet, and he was puzzled at first as he looked at the elkhide handcraft of his
medicine man.  "Big chief," the medicine man exclaimed joyfully, "I have found the way to cover the Earth with leather!  For you, O chief, from now on
the Earth will always be covered with leather."  And so it was.
The Man Who Married A Bear

A Nez Perce Legend
A man named Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War (Pakatamapautx) lived with his father at Asotin, and in the spring of the year the youth would go away
from home and lose himself till fall.  He would tell no one where he had been.  Now, he really was accustomed to go up the Little Salmon (Hun'he) branch
of the Grande Ronde River to fish for salmon.  It was the second year that he went there that this thing happened.

A bear girl lived just below the forks of Asotin Creek, and from that place she used to go over onto the Little Salmon, where
Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War had a camp made of boughs.  One day, after fishing, he was lying in his camp not quite asleep.  He heard the noise of
someone walking in the woods.  He heard the noise of walking go all around the camp.  The grizzly-bear girl was afraid to go near the man, and soon
she went away and left him.  Next morning he tried to track her; and while he could see the tracks in the grass, he could not tell what it was that made
them.

Next day the youth hunted deer in order to have dried meat for the winter; and that evening the grizzly-bear girl, dressed up as a human being, came into
his camp.  Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War had just finished his supper when he heard the footfalls, and, looking out into the forest, he saw a fine girl
come into the open.  He wondered if this person was what he had heard the night before.

He asked the girl to tell him what she wanted, and she came and sat down beside him.  The youth was bashful and could not talk to her, although she was
a pretty girl.  Then he said, "Where are you camping?"  And she told him that three days before she had come from the forks of Asotin Creek.

"I came to see you, and to find out whether or not you would marry me."

Now, Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War did not know of anyone who lived above the mouth of Asotin Creek, and for that reason he told the girl he would
take home his meat and salmon and return in ten days.  So the girl went back to the forks of Asotin Creek, and the youth to the mouth of the stream with
his meat.  Then they returned and met; and the youth fell deeply in love with the girl, and married her.

So they lived in his camp until she said to him, "Now we will go to my home."

And when they arrived, he saw that she had a fine supply of winter food -- dried salmon, dried meat, camas, kaus, sanitx, serviceberries, and
huckleberries.  But what most surprised him was that they went into a hole in the ground, because then he knew she must be a bear.

It grew late in the fall, and they had to stay in the cave, for the girl could not go out.  In the dead of winter they were still in the cave when the snow began
to settle and harden.  One night, near midnight, when both were asleep in their beds, the grizzly-bear girl dreamed, and roared out in her sleep.

She told her husband to build a fire and make a light.  Then the grizzly-bear girl sang a song, and blood came running from her mouth.  She said, "This
blood you see coming from my mouth is not my blood.  It is the blood of men.  Down at the mouth of Asotin Creek the hunters are making ready for a
bear hunt.  They have observed this cave, and five hunters are coming here to see if a bear is in it."  The grizzly-bear girl in her sleep knew that the hunters
were making ready.

Next morning the five hunters went up to that place, and that same morning the grizzly-bear girl donned a different dress from what she usually wore, a
dress that was painted red.  She told her husband, "Soon after the sun leaves the earth, these hunters will be here, and then I will do my killing."

They arrived, and Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War heard them talking.  He heard them say that something must be living in the cave.  When the first
hunter came to the door of the cave, the grizzly-bear girl rushed out and killed him.  Then the four other hunters went home and told the news, and ten
hunters made ready to come up and kill the bear.  They camped close by for the night.



About midnight the grizzly-bear girl had another dream.  She sang a song, and told her husband, "I will leave you as soon as the sun is up.  This blood
you see coming out of my mouth is my own blood.  The hunters are close by, and will soon be here."

Soon the youth heard the hunters talking.  Then they took a pole and hung an empty garment near the mouth of the cave, and the bear rushed out at this
decoy.  When she turned to go back, they fired, and killed her.

The youth in the cave heard the hunters say, "Watch out!  There must be another one in the cave."

So he decided he would go out; and when he came into the light, the hunters recognized him.  He went home with them and told the story.

This was the year before the French trappers came, and Five-Times-Surrounded-in-War went away with them.  In a year he returned, and after that he
disappeared.
When Sweat Lodge Was Human

A Nez Perce Legend
Long ago, in the days of the Animal People, Sweat Lodge was a man.  He foresaw the coming of Human Beings, the real inhabitants of the Earth.  So one
day he called all the Animal People together to give each one a name and to tell him his duties.  In the council, the Sweat Lodge stood up and made a
speech:

"We have lived on Earth for a long while, but we shall not be in our present condition much longer.  A different People are coming to live here.  We must
part from each other and go to different places.  Each of you must decide whether you wish to belong to the Animal beings that walk, fly or creep or those
that swim.  You may now make your choice."

Then Sweat Lodge turned to Elk.  "You will first come this way, Elk.  What do you wish to be?"

"I wish to be what I am -- an Elk."

"Let us see you run or gallop," said Sweat Lodge.

So Elk galloped off in a graceful manner, and returned.

"You are right," decided Sweat Lodge.  "You are an Elk."

Elk galloped off, and the rest saw no more of him.

Sweat Lodge called Eagle and asked, "What do you wish to be, Eagle?"

"Just what I am -- an Eagle."

"Let us see you fly," replied Sweat Lodge.

Eagle flew, rising higher and higher with hardly a ripple on his outstretched wings.

Sweat Lodge called him back and said, "You are an Eagle.  You will be king over all the Birds of the Air.  You will soar in the Sky.  You will live on the
crags and peaks of the highest Mountains.  Human Beings will admire you."

Eagle flew away happy.  Everyone watch him disappear in the Sky.

"I wish to be like Eagle," Bluejay told Sweat Lodge.

Wanting to give everyone a chance, Sweat Lodge said again, "then let us see you fly."

Bluejay tried to imitate the easy, graceful flight of Eagle, but failed to keep his balance and was soon flapping his wings.

Sweat Lodge called him back.  "A Jay is a Jay.  You will have to be content as you are."  

When Bear came forward, Sweat Lodge said, "You will be known among Human Beings as a very fierce Animal.  You will kill and eat People, and they
will fear you."

Bear went off into the woods and has since been known as a fierce animal.

Then to all walking creatures, except Coyote, and to all flying creatures, to all Animals and Birds, all Snakes, Frogs, Turtles and fish Sweat Lodge gave
names, and the creatures scattered.

After they were gone, Sweat Lodge called Coyote to him and said, "You have been wise and cunning.  You have been a man to be feared.  When this Earth
becomes like the air, empty and void, your name shall last forever.  The new Human Beings who come will hear your name and say, 'Yes, Coyote was
great in his time.'  Now, what do you wish to be?"

"I have long lived as a Coyote," he replied.  "I want to be noble like Eagle or Elk or Cougar."

Sweat Lodge let him show what he could do.  First, Coyote tried his best to fly like Eagle, but could only jump around, this way and that.  Then he tried to
imitate Elk in his graceful gallop.  He succeeded for a short distance, but soon fell into his own gait.  He stopped short and looked around.

"You look exactly like yourself, Coyote," laughed Sweat Lodge.  "You will be a Coyote."

Poor Coyote ran off, howling, to some unknown place.  Before he got out of sight he stopped, turned his head and stood -- just like a coyote.

Sweat Lodge, left alone, spoke to himself:  "All now are gone, and the new People will be coming soon.  When they arrive they should find something to
give them strength and power.

"I will place myself on the ground, for the use of Human Beings who are to come.  Whoever visits me now and then, to him I will give power.  He will
become great in war and great in peace.  He will have success in fishing and in hunting.  To all who come to me for protection, I will give strength and
power."

Sweat Lodge spoke with earnestness.  Then he lay down on his hands and knees and waited for the first People.  He has lain that way ever since and has
given power to all who sought it from him.
Yellow Jacket and Ant

A Nez Perce Legend
Envy will cause good friends to become enemies.  Ant was jealous of Yellow Jacket eating salmon, even though he himself has as much food and comforts
of living.  Ant invaded his neighbor's privacy and destroyed their friendship.  Because neither would listen his warning, Coyote turned them both into
stone as an example for the Human Beings who were coming.

The Yellow Jackets and the Ants all lived together on the hillside about ten miles above Tse-me-na-kem (Lewiston, Idaho), on the Clearwater River.  The
two families were quite friendly, although every once in a while members would get into an argument, which is no more than natural.

There was quite a bit of jealousy between the Chief of the Yellow Jackets and the Chief of the Ants.  This was not real hatred, but each saw to it that his
rights were not harmed.  On the whole, the two bosses got along pretty well, considering their gossiping wives and their many children.

Chief Yellow Jacket was used top eating his meals on top of a certain rock, and he liked dried salmon the best.  One day, he was seated on this rock, calmly
eating a big dish of dried salmon which his wife had set before him.

Along came Chief Ant, and seeing Chief Yellow Jacket calmly eating his dinner, he became very angry.  It is true that there were other rocks around for
him to use, and he could have had dried salmon if he wished, but the sight of Chief Yellow Jacket made him very angry.  "Hey there, you Yellow Jacket," he
shouted at him, "What are you doing on the rock?  I have as much right there as you.  You can't eat there without asking me."  

Chief Yellow Jacket looked up in surprise.  "Why, Ant, what are you shouting about?  I have always eaten my dinner on this rock."

"That makes no difference," said the Ant.  "Why didn't you ask me about it?"

Yellow Jacket had by this time become very angry too.  He rattled his wings and snapped his legs and yelled, "None of your business, you little runt."

"Don't call me a runt," shouted Ant.  "Nobody can insult me that way."

So saying that, Ant climbed up the side of the rock, and he and Yellow Jacket began to fight all over it.  They fought face to face, and with arms locked
about each other, they reared up on their hind legs, biting and poking for all they were worth.

Suddenly a great voice boomed out, "Here, you Ant and Yellow Jacket,stop that fighting."

It was Coyote, who happened to be passing down on the other side of the river.  He had seen them struggling, but neither of them heard him because they
were too busy fighting.

Again Coyote shouted, "You, Ant, and you, Yellow Jacket, I order you to stop fighting.  My subjects cannot fight.  There is plenty of room and plenty of
food for all of us, so why be foolish?"

This time they heard, but neither of them would stop.  A third time Coyote warned them, "This is the last time, I'm going to tell you now.  Stop fighting or I
shall turn you both into stone.  You will no longer be great, for the La-te-tel-wit (Human Beings) are coming."

They paid no heed, so Coyote used his magic medicine, waved his paws, and just as Ant and Yellow Jacket were arched together, Coyote turned them to
stone.

To this day they remain for all to see, locked in each others arms on top of the big rock where Yellow Jacket ate his meals, but which became a battle
ground because of greed.
Nez Perce Legends